Huskies for Liberty

We are a registered student organization dedicated to promoting the values of free speech, individual rights, limited government, and consent on the University of Washington campus and beyond.

ABOUT

About
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We are Huskies for Liberty. We are a registered student organization on the University of Washington campus dedicated to promoting the values of free speech, individual rights, limited government, and consent on the University of Washington campus and beyond.

Locally-controlled, independent, and nonpartisan, we invite students of any/no political party affiliation to join us for important discussions on free choice, individuality, voluntaryism, and other topics pertaining to classical liberalism and related movements. It is our goal to engage with the UW Seattle student body and challenge prevailing paradigms regarding the proper relationship between individual and state, as well as those between individuals and society at large.

We aspire to invite pro-free speech and pro-liberty speakers to our campus and to provide an exciting and fulfilling social environment for our exceptional members. We meet weekly on Wednesday at 6 PM in Savery 169.

Why Free Speech?
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Freedom of speech is a critical value to a healthy, democratic society. When people are free to express their viewpoints without fear of retaliation, it promotes open dialogue and debate, making sure everyone's concerns have a chance to be voiced. Free speech protects minority voices and ensures that everyone has the right to participate in public discourse, regardless of their beliefs. The right to freely express yourself is a cornerstone of democratic societies, and is essential for promoting tolerance, understanding, and social progress.

Currently, free speech is under siege at the University of Washington. The UW was ranked 188th out of 203 secondary education institutions for free speech according to a student survey conducted by the non-partisan civil rights organization, the Foundation for Individual Rights and Expression, making UW the lowest ranked public school for free speech.

69 percent of UW students surveyed said that shouting down speakers to prevent them from speaking is acceptable, and 57 percent of UW students surveyed said that they have engaged in self-censorship on campus.

Free speech at the UW faces challenges on two fronts: student culture, and administrative code. It is important to cultivate a culture of liberal discussion and free expression of ideas among the student body. In addition, the UW has administrative codes which create challenges for free speech, such as Executive Order 31, which is currently being challenged in a federal lawsuit on against the UW on grounds of free speech, a Constitutionally-protected right. When students and faculty at the UW feel intimidated from expressing themselves, it prevents UW from fulfilling its academic role as a place where new ideas are shared and discussed.